Babywearing Book Review, by Maria Blois: Baby Carriers Book

The Babywearing Book talks about the benefits of babywearing, from better sleep to reduced crying spells to enhanced learning and development. Obviously, we also know that babywearing is convenient, and that’s definitely a topic they don’t forget to ignore. The benefits of baby wearing have already been discussed, but the Babywearing Book discusses these benefits and more, and goes into a great deal of depth about this for both the benefit of the baby and the benefit of the parent.

One of these benefits is that carried time is considered “tummy time,” according to the book and experts who work in child development. In fact, babyworn time might be better than tummy time, a fact that should resound well with parents who wear their children more often than not.

Babywearing Book Review, by Maria Blois: Baby Carriers Book

Interestingly, we talk about parents wearing babies, since that’s typical. Mommies wear babies the most. But daddies can too. Older (much older) siblings can, as can grandparents and babysitters. The more babies are carried and worn, the happier the baby is. Do you ever wonder why your baby cries and then calms down as soon as you put him in your arms?

The Babywearing Book also interviews babywearers around the country, and it is helpful to get other perspectives.

The book will also help you discover which is the best type of baby carrier for you. This section of the book is supplemented with charts that help you discover which baby wearing product is most ideal for your needs. You can even learn how to make your own baby carrier (which is also something you can do with the Baby Gami book).

You can also read more about why baby wearing is helpful for your child, but also for the child who may need more attention. What if your child is fussy? There’s a section for that too. And if you are a mother who is out of the house because you work a lot, you’re not left in the dark either. If you have twins, triplets, or other multiples, babywearing isn’t an impossibility, and the author discusses this in the book. Even parents of adopted children have been accounted for. (And if you’re the parent with special needs, pick up the book too; there’s a section for you as well).

You’ll learn about baby slings, baby front carriers, backpack carriers, torso carriers, and more. (You won’t learn that much about the Baby Bjorn, because the author doesn’t like it that much. But as you can tell, there are more options available.) And if that wasn’t enough, you’ll get thorough instructions on how to put your baby in them, so you don’t get lost along the way. The Babywearing book has step-by-step instructions with great deal. And the reviews of all carriers are unbiased.

The end of the book has useful appendices for later reference. One appendix features additional babywearing resources, in case the book itself wasn’t enough. The other appendix has vendor information about the baby carriers explored in the book.

The book is a great read for first-time parents or even parents who already have one or two little ones (but want more). It’s comprehensive, detailed, and reinforces the idea that baby carriers are not such a bad thing after all. Most would agree with me that this is the ultimate babywearing book.

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